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Native American Tribes in Louisiana

Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw of Louisiana: State Recognized Indian Tribes of Lafourche & Terrebonne - Restored using WayBack

Note: The website for the Confederation has expired - BUT GOOD NEWS! Paul LeBlanc has found a way using a feature called WayBack to restore the site to an earlier time. I'm still trying to contact the Tribal officials re the current and planned status.

There is a separate website for the Isle de Jean Charles Band. Links for the other two groups will be added asap. If anyone has info, please send an email to cajun@thecajuns.com

Attakapas - History Coushatta Nation Tunica or Tunica History
Bayougoula - History

United Houma Nation

See the GENEALOGICAL REPORT ON THE UNITED HOUMA NATION, INC - from the original at the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana: Official Site
Caddo - History Jena Band of the Choctaw - History Yazoo - History
Chitimacha Nation Opelousas - History Natchez - History

Removal of Natchitoches IndiansNatchitoch - Moved from Natchitoches, LA in 1858 to Indian Territory - now Oklahoma. Link is to a Handbook of Texas Online article. Image is a plaque in Natchitoches, LA. Click on it for a larger view.

Indian Chiefs in SW LA Records Indians Mentioned in SW LA Records

See the Books and Publications Page for the following books:

The American Heritage Book of Indians - tribal history and great photos. 1982 Hardbound edition of book that was 1st published in 1961. The Foreword is by President John F. Kennedy.

Indians of Arkansas

The History of the Five Indian Nations

The Iroquois

The Wichita Indians

First Native North American Saint

On Sunday, Octoer 21, 2012, Pope Benedict XVI canonized Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native North American Saint.

Known as the "Lily of the Mohawks," Kateri was born in 1656 to a pagan Iroquois father and an Algonquin Christian mother in what is today upstate New York. Her parents and only brother died when she was 4 during a smallpox epidemic that left her badly scarred and with impaired eyesight. She went to live with her uncle, a Mohawk, and was baptized Catholic by Jesuit missionaries. But she was ostracized and persecuted by other natives for her faith, and she died in Canada when she was 24.

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